Uncommon Origins Anthology: Earn Royalties for Short Stories
Dec10

Uncommon Origins Anthology: Earn Royalties for Short Stories

Uncommon Origins Anthology: Earn Royalties for Short Stories Fighting Monkey Press is seeking submissions from writers who want to earn royalties for short stories. The editor wants to see short stories that relate to the beginning of something new and unique for their upcoming anthology “Uncommon Origins”. Stories should be under 10,000 words, although the editor may consider longer works. Stories can be about something on the grand scale of Gods or the more personal scope of the individual. Stories within any genre are accepted, although any submissions that display elements of hatred or intolerance of any kind will not be accepted. The editor particularly encourages short stories with fantasy or magical realism elements incorporated into the plot. The editor encourages submissions from international writers, although all submissions should be written in American English. No reprints or simultaneous submissions will be accepted. There is a limit of two short story submissions per person for this anthology. Submissions open on 1st January 2016 and close on 28th February 2016. Acceptances are scheduled to be sent out by 15th March. Payment for accepted stories is via royalty share. You can view the full writer’s submission guidelines here: http://www.fightingmonkeypress.com/submissions/ The publisher’s previous anthology collection “Uncommon Bodies” was launched to rave reviews. If you want to check what writing style the editor prefers before you submit your short story, you can find the previous anthology here: Like this post? Share it with...

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Cicada Magazine: Earn up to $2,000 for YA Short Stories
Aug31

Cicada Magazine: Earn up to $2,000 for YA Short Stories

Cicada Magazine: Earn up to $2,000 for YA Short Stories   Cicada Magazine is open for submissions! They want to see YA short stories, comics, poems and nonfiction essays aimed at a young adult audience. The editors want to see fiction up to a maximum of 9,000 words with a focus on realism, SF/fantasy or historical fiction. Articles of narrative nonfiction and essays on literature/culture/arts, especially if written from a teen perspective, are also welcomed. Maximum word count for non-fiction is 5,000 words. From time to time the editors will request specific themes for upcoming issues. Always check the full submission guidelines to check if any themes are required before submitting.   According to their website, the editors at Cicada want a variety of YA short stories with a specific theme included in their future issues. The theme changes with each issue, as does the deadline, so it’s worth checking back regularly to see what else they may require. Payment for unpublished stories and articles is up to 25 cents per word. Payment for poetry is $3 per line. Cicada Magazine may consider reprints, but the pay rate is generally much less than the rate paid for unpublished work. All stories and articles submitted to Cicada Magazine must be submitted via their online portal at Submittable. Promising manuscripts will be reviewed and editors will work with writers on any revisions that may be required.   You can read the full writer’s submission guidelines here: https://cricketmag.submittable.com/submit/17820   . Like this post? Share it with...

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Increasing Book Sales through Various Amazon Platforms
Jul13

Increasing Book Sales through Various Amazon Platforms

  Increasing Book Sales through Various Amazon Platforms Increasing book sales usually sparks a discussion about book promotion and marketing methods. However, there are some different platforms you could try that could potentially increase sales and boost your income at the same time. Here are some Amazon publishing platforms that could broaden your book’s audience.   Kindle Singles Kindle Singles are ideal for self-publishing short stories or novellas. Your story won’t automatically be published, as it would with KDP. Instead, you need to submit your original, unpublished short story to Kindle Singles for consideration. Amazon states that the minimum accepted word count is 2,500 words, but they prefer to see longer word counts between 5,000 and 10,000 words in their Singles range. Kindle Singles should be priced between 0.99c and $4.99. Amazon pay 70% royalty for Kindle Singles, even if your Single is priced below $2.99. You can learn more about Kindle Singles here: http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html   Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) The KDP platform gives you the freedom to publish your own books and take control of your own royalties. You simply upload your book files and cover graphic. Choose your own price for your books and write a brief description or blurb. Press submit and your book should be available for sale in the Kindle eBookstore in around 24-48 hours. Technically, the minimum word count Amazon will accept for a novel into Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) is 2,500. You can set your own price for your books in the Kindle eBookstore. Books priced between $0.99c and $2.98 earn 30% royalty on sales. Books priced over $2.99 will earn 70% royalty on sales. You can learn more about Kindle Direct Publishing here: https://kdp.amazon.com/   KDP Select If you enroll your ebook into the KDP Select program, it will automatically be included in the KU/KOLL programs. In order to qualify for the KDP Select program your book must be available exclusively through Amazon and can’t be distributed digitally anywhere else. Kindle Unlimited (KU) is a subscription program for readers that allows them to read as many books as they want during the subscription period. That’s great for voracious readers who devour several books each week. Kindle Owners’ Lending Library (KOLL) allows people who own Kindle readers to borrow one book per month with no due date. Payment is based on the number of pages read. It’s difficult to estimate how much you’re paid per page read, but it’s approximately between $0.005 and $0.015 per page read. You can learn more about KDP Select here: https://kdp.amazon.com/select   Audiobook Creation Exchange (ACX) You can turn your book into an audio book with Audiobook...

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Word Counts for Fiction: How Long Should Your Story Be?
Jul13

Word Counts for Fiction: How Long Should Your Story Be?

  A common question asked by many writers is: “How long should my story be?” The simplest answer is: As long as it takes to tell the whole story. However, there are certain word counts that editors prefer to see when submitting work. Here is an approximate word count guideline for story lengths: Micro-Fiction – up to 100 words This very abbreviated story is often difficult to write, and even harder to write well, but the markets for micro fiction are becoming increasingly popular in recent times. Publishers love them, as they take up almost no room and don’t cost them their budgets. Pay rates are often low, but for so few words, the rate per word averages quite high. Flash Fiction 100 – 1,000 words This is the type of short-short story you would expect to find in a glossy magazine, often used to fill one page of quick romance (or quick humor, in men’s mags) Very popular, quick and easy to write, and easier to sell! Short Story 1,000 – 7,500 words The ‘regular’ short story, usually found in periodicals or anthology collections. Most ‘genre’ zines will features works at this length. Novellette 7,500 – 17,500 words Often a novellette-length work is difficult to sell to a publisher. It is considered too long for most publishers to insert comfortably into a magazine, yet too short for a novel. Generally, authors will piece together three or four novellette-length works into a compilation novel. Novella 17,500 – 40,000 words Although most print publishers will balk at printing a novel this short, this is almost perfect for the electronic publishing market length. The online audience doesn’t always have the time or the patience to sit through a 100,000 word novel. Alternatively, this is an acceptable length for a short work of non-fiction. Novel 40,000 – 100,000 Most print publishers prefer a minimum word count of around 65,000 words for a first novel, and some even hesitate for any work shorter than 80,000. Yet any piece of fiction climbing over the 100,000 word mark also tends to give editors some pause. They need to be sure they can produce a product that won’t over-extend their budget, but still be enticing enough to readers to be saleable. Imagine paying good money for a book less than a quarter-inch thick? Epics and Sequels Over 100,000 words If your story extends too far over the 100,000 mark, perhaps consider where you could either condense the story to only include relevant details, or lengthen it to span out into a sequel, or perhaps even a trilogy. (Unless, of course, you’re Stephen King – then it...

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Aliens & Fairies: Non-Human Characters Acting Badly
Jul08

Aliens & Fairies: Non-Human Characters Acting Badly

  Most speculative fiction writers have a tendency to include a non-human character or two in their novels these days. Hard science fiction writers like to throw in a random bug-eyed, slime-dripping menace with which to threaten their heroes. Soft science fiction writers prefer the friendly alien races who act and speak like us, but have some physical differences. Fantasy writers tend to adopt a couple of aloof elves, maybe a few rabid dwarves, a dragon or two, and a cute green-skinned goblin for good measure. But is there any point to these additions? Motives Is your central plot driven around your protagonist being chased and terrorized by a rampant alien attack? Perhaps your aliens are there because a slime-dripping critter torturing people would be fun to write. Maybe you wanted your humans to colonize a new world, but needed them to overcome the “vicious natives” first, before making friends and living happily ever after. In each of the cases above, alien characters are not truly required in order to make the story work. Ask yourself if that attack might not be even more fearful if conducted by people they actually understand. Perhaps that poor critter dripping slime all over your command deck actually expresses pain through its secretory glands – that would take all the fun out of writing a cool goo-dripping creature. Take a closer look at your own motives for wanting a non-human character in your story. If you suddenly find that it isn’t necessary for an alien to be in your story, then replacing that character with a human counterpart who thinks in an alien way might be more productive. If the inclusion of non-human characters into your story is simply for the ‘cute’ factor of having someone non-human to play with, then maybe all your characters should be human. If the story itself needs the inclusion of an alien, then make that creature as believable as you can. Characters By now, you would have spent extensive amounts of time developing and realizing your protagonist’s character. You would be aware of his personality traits, his weaknesses and strengths, his looks, and most importantly, his innermost desires. And, if you’re truly serious about becoming a pro in this profession, you would have done the same background research on your villain too. But how many writers actually take the time to research their non-human counterparts? The word “Alien” does not necessarily mean “a creature from outer space”. It can simply mean anything which is perceived as different, or even as coming from another country. The Oxford Concise Dictionary lists the word “alien” thus: noun 1: a foreigner,...

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